Quick & easy low-fat Thai peanut sauce (Vegan, No oil) * Plant Based Recipes: Easy Oil Free Vegan Recipes (2024)

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I have been meaning to make a low-fat peanut sauce for ages. There are many recipes of course, but I had some red Thai curry paste to use up and thought this might be a great and easy addition of spices in my peanut sauce. I also wanted to use peanut flour for a low-fat version, and also because peanut flour doesn’t aggravate my system the way peanut butter does (food intolerance).

I didn’t know how to thicken it up nicely without using coconut milk, as I always had in the past. While delicious, we have completely excluded it from our diet after going low-fat earlier this year (for reasons McDougall and Esselstyn, among others, advocate). So what to use? Silken tofu is one way to thicken up sauces, so I added this into the sauce and it turned out great. The peanut flour adds a ton of flavor also without the fat. If you cannot find peanut flour, you can use powdered peanut butter instead (the only difference is sweetener).


Quick & easy low-fat Thai peanut sauce (Vegan, No oil) * Plant Based Recipes: Easy Oil Free Vegan Recipes (3)

Low fat vegan thai peanut sauce (Quick version)

This low fat thai peanut sauce does not use coconut milk, oil, or any animal products. Vegan, low fat and delicious!

3.88 from 8 votes

Print Pin Rate

Course: Sauces, Spreads & Condiments

Cuisine: Asian, Thai

Keyword: apple cider vinegar, massaman curry paste, peanut flour, plant-based milk, powdered peanut butter, red curry paste, tofu

Prep Time: 15 minutes minutes

Total Time: 15 minutes minutes

Servings: 8 Servings

Calories: 33kcal

Author: Jen deHaan

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup defatted peanut flour Or sub powdered peanut butter. See notes.
  • 3 oz tofu firm or silken, plain
  • 2 Tbsp red curry paste See notes
  • 1.5 oz non-dairy milk cashew, oat, rice etc
  • 1.5 oz apple cider vinegar
  • 2 tsp maple syrup or stevia to taste, optional

Instructions

  • Combine all ingredients in a food processor or blender and combine until smooth.

  • This recipe is a somewhat thick consistency, and can be used as a spread or dip or mixed into noodle dishes. Add additional vinegar and/or water for a thinner consistency suitable for bowls or drizzles.

Notes

Peanut flour: Because peanut flour is not sweetened, you may want to add an additional tablespoon of maple syrup, or some additional stevia.

Spice paste: Make sure your red curry paste does not contain animal ingredients or oil. Maesri, Aroy-D or Thai Kitchen Red Curry Paste is one example that fits this description. You can also use Massaman (Masaman) Curry paste for a less-spicy version of this sauce, but you will also have to check the ingredients (there are vegan versions out there. Of course, you can always make your own too.

Nutrition Facts

Low fat vegan thai peanut sauce (Quick version)

Serving Size

2 Tbsp

Amount per Serving

Calories

33

% Daily Value*

Fat

g

%

Cholesterol

mg

%

Sodium

10

mg

%

Potassium

55

mg

2

%

Carbohydrates

3

g

1

%

Fiber

g

%

Sugar

1

g

1

%

Protein

3

g

6

%

Vitamin C

0.7

mg

1

%

Calcium

33

mg

3

%

Iron

0.3

mg

2

%

* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

Tried this recipe? Customized it?Let us know how it was in the comments!

There are many alternative spices you could add. If you need to add a bit of additional heat, use some thai chili hot sauce or paste. You can add a bit of tamarind paste for some extra citrus.

This sauce goes wonderfully in noodle dishes, of course. I added it to my lunch of ramen noodles and leftover broccoli slaw – a rather odd combination (emptying out the fridge), but combined perfectly flavor wise (I added some red chili flakes for heat). It will work as a dip for vegetables, a spread in a wrap, or a stir fry with broccoli and bean sprouts.

Tonight I thinned out this sauce to make a salad/bowl dressing. I added a few heaping spoonfuls of the sauce, and a bit of water, apple cider vinegar, a touch of maple syrup, and a squirt of Sriracha for heat before mixing it well with a whisk.

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  • Author
  • Recent Posts

Jen deHaan

Owner at Plant Based Recipe

Jen is a plant-based nutrition enthusiast and vegan living in British Columbia, Canada. She has over 20 years experience in software, graphics, and art, including many years in Silicon Valley corporations. Jen completed the Developing Healthy Communities graduate program at Tufts University's Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy. Jen really likes dogs and dancing too.

Latest posts by Jen deHaan (see all)

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About Post Author

Jen deHaan

Jen is a plant-based nutrition enthusiast and vegan living in British Columbia, Canada. She has over 20 years experience in software, graphics, and art, including many years in Silicon Valley corporations. Jen completed the Developing Healthy Communities graduate program at Tufts University’s Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy. Jen really likes dogs and dancing too.

See author's posts

About Jen deHaan

Jen is a plant-based nutrition enthusiast and vegan living in British Columbia, Canada. She has over 20 years experience in software, graphics, and art, including many years in Silicon Valley corporations. Jen completed the Developing Healthy Communities graduate program at Tufts University's Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy. Jen really likes dogs and dancing too.

Reader Interactions

Comments

  1. Colleen

    Quick & easy low-fat Thai peanut sauce (Vegan, No oil) * Plant Based Recipes: Easy Oil Free Vegan Recipes (14)
    Thank you for the great recipe. It is delicious! I follow Esselstyn’s diet and this recipe is perfect!

    Reply

  2. Gail

    Quick & easy low-fat Thai peanut sauce (Vegan, No oil) * Plant Based Recipes: Easy Oil Free Vegan Recipes (15)
    I made this today using PB2 instead of peanut flour and stevia. I poured it over steamed shirataki & oat fibre spaghetti noodles and steamed broccoli and snap peas. Delicious!!! Then I tried it with a bit of soy sauce. Delicious!!! And then I tried it with a tiny bit of True Lime crystals. Delicious!!! Thank you!!!

    Reply

    • Gail

      And, yes, I ate it for breakfast. YUM!!!

      Reply

    • Jen @ Plant Based Recipe

      Hi Gail – thanks SO much for letting us know it went well, and the application sounds SO good! Love that you tried it with a bit of True Lime crystals and for breakfast too! Inspiration happening over here 🙂

      Reply

  3. Theresa D Esterline

    I just want to make sure this is 2 TB red curry paste… it says 2 TB cup red curry paste… I’m thinking the cup is in error, yes?

    Reply

  4. Kyla Dimmett

    The recipe says 8 servings. How many ounces or tsp. in one serving please?

    Reply

    • Jen @ Plant Based Recipe

      Hi Kyla! It’s roughly 2 Tbsp (sorry, my really old recipes didn’t have the option to enter this!)

      Reply

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Quick & easy low-fat Thai peanut sauce (Vegan, No oil) * Plant Based Recipes: Easy Oil Free Vegan Recipes (2024)

FAQs

Is Thai Peanut Sauce bad for you? ›

While Thai Peanut Sauce is one of the most delicious sauces on the planet, it's not normally paired with the word "healthy". Most peanut sauces contain loads of sugar and coconut milk or cream, resulting in a sauce that's high in fat and calories.

What is Thai Peanut Sauce made of? ›

Thai Peanut Sauce is made up of peanut butter, soy sauce, ginger, a sweetener (I used maple syrup), rice wine vinegar, sesame seeds, a spice and water. In some more traditional versions, coconut milk is used instead of water, but I find this combination to be perfect.

What is a substitute for peanut satay sauce? ›

How to make this Nut-Free “Peanut” Sauce
  • Sunbutter – I prefer this smooth brand with no added sugar. ...
  • Coconut aminos – This soy sauce alternative is made from reducing coconut sap until it's dark and syrupy. ...
  • Garlic powder.
  • Red pepper flakes – These are optional if you don't want it spicy.
  • Fine sea salt.
Jan 8, 2019

What goes with Thai Peanut Sauce? ›

Carrots, broccoli, cucumbers, red peppers, and snow peas are just some of the vegetables that taste great when paired with Thai Peanut Sauce.

What is unhealthy in Thai food? ›

Traditional Thai cuisine is quite healthy and largely based on vegetables, lean proteins, and fresh herbs and spices. Certain Thai dishes are high in refined carbs and may contain deep-fried foods, added sugar, or high amounts of salt.

Do you have to refrigerate Thai peanut sauce? ›

Simply keep it in a cool, dark place. Generally, an unopened bottle of peanut sauce will last about a year if it's stored correctly. While it's a good idea to keep the “use by” date in mind, it's usually just fine for a few months after that date. Once the bottle is opened, you'll need to keep it in the refrigerator.

What is Thai peanut sauce called? ›

Satay sauce, often referred to as peanut sauce is a sauce widely used in Thai cuisine, Malaysian cuisine, Indonesian cuisine, and Chinese cuisine. (under different names) It is also used in some European cuisine.

What is the difference between satay sauce and peanut sauce? ›

Although commonly associated with Thai cuisine, peanut sauce actually originated in Indonesia (source). What Americans know as peanut sauce is more commonly referred to as satay sauce (or bumbu kacang) in Indonesia, because it's most often served with the popular Indonesian dish, satay (skewered, grilled meats).

What is the difference between Chinese and Thai satay? ›

The Chinese take out version of Chicken in Satay Sauce is quite different from Malaysian, Thai and Indonesian Satay Sauce. It's less coconut-y and less peanut-y (are they real words??), doesn't have bits of crushed peanuts in the sauce, and has a stronger flavour from satay seasoning.

What is the best substitute for peanut butter? ›

5 Nut-Free Alternatives to Peanut Butter
  1. Sunflower Seed Butter. The closest spread to peanut butter I've found in terms of flavor and texture is sunflower seed butter. ...
  2. Tahini. I love how sesame seeds give this Middle Eastern staple toasty, nutty flavors. ...
  3. Cookie Butter. I know, I know. ...
  4. Soynut Butter. ...
  5. Coconut Butter.

How long does homemade Thai peanut sauce last? ›

I suggest doubling or tripling the recipe to have throughout the week with salad rolls, roasted veggies, and salads. How long with the sauce last? The Peanut Sauce will last up to 1 week in a tightly sealed container in the fridge.

Do they eat peanut sauce in Thailand? ›

In Thailand, Peanut Sauce is most often used a as a dip to accompany skewers of barbequed meat (satay), although it is sometimes served as a side dish in its own right as part of a larger meal.

What does Bangkok peanut sauce taste like? ›

HOUSE OF TSANG® Bangkok Peanut Sauce is nutty and mild, with garlic, ginger, and lemongrass. But don't let the name fool you: our Thai peanut sauce is more than just for Thai food! Use it on chicken wings or as a marinade when you're cooking on the grill for extra nutty flavor.

How healthy is peanut sauce? ›

Peanut sauce can be a healthy addition to any diet. Since it is made from peanut butter, it naturally has some protein. Look for ones with not a lot of sodium or added sugar. Better yet, when making it at home, you have full control over the quality of the ingredients.

How unhealthy is satay sauce? ›

Best: Chicken Satay

Satays are usually served with a spicy-sweet peanut sauce. Instead of dunking each skewer, put a little on your plate. Two tablespoons of the sauce serve up 80 calories and nearly 10% of all the sodium you should get in a day.

Is Thai peanut sauce high in sugar? ›

Thai peanut sauce, thai peanut by Hy-Vee, Inc. Thai peanut sauce by BRANDLESS contains 35 calories per 18 g serving. This serving contains 2 g of fat, 1 g of protein and 3 g of carbohydrate. The latter is 3 g sugar and 1 g of dietary fiber, the rest is complex carbohydrate.

How many calories are in Thai peanut dressing? ›

Original Joe's Dressings Thai Peanut Vinaigrette (1 serving) contains 4g total carbs, 4g net carbs, 7g fat, 1g protein, and 80 calories.

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